Comments on: Review: Patternmaking for Menswear http://www.fashion-incubator.com/archive/review-patternmaking-for-menswear/ How to start a clothing line or run the one you have, better. Wed, 16 Jul 2014 03:17:30 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.1 By: Joe Smoehttp://www.fashion-incubator.com/archive/review-patternmaking-for-menswear/comment-page-1/#comment-183407 Thu, 01 May 2014 18:51:52 +0000 http://www.fashion-incubator.com/?p=13545#comment-183407 I guess you don’t like the truth

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By: Joe Smoehttp://www.fashion-incubator.com/archive/review-patternmaking-for-menswear/comment-page-1/#comment-183406 Thu, 01 May 2014 17:27:09 +0000 http://www.fashion-incubator.com/?p=13545#comment-183406 I’ll give you an opinion based on many years of experience the author failed miserably right from the start ,and so did every so called experts who critiqued the book.
in menswear the layout of the pattern is totally the opposite meaning that if I am at the table the closest thing to me is the back the furthest from me is the front.
So this was just an attempt to write a pattern book for menswear, it looks to me more like women’s wear.

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By: Jessamynhttp://www.fashion-incubator.com/archive/review-patternmaking-for-menswear/comment-page-1/#comment-183343 Thu, 03 Apr 2014 22:53:41 +0000 http://www.fashion-incubator.com/?p=13545#comment-183343 Re: “basic anorak (North American readers would describe this as a partial zip front hoodie with over sized front pocket)” – as a former ’80s Northern California teenager, I would call that a kangaroo pocket. I don’t know how widespread that usage is, though.

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By: theresa in tucsonhttp://www.fashion-incubator.com/archive/review-patternmaking-for-menswear/comment-page-1/#comment-183208 Sat, 22 Feb 2014 00:23:35 +0000 http://www.fashion-incubator.com/?p=13545#comment-183208 My copy of the book arrived this week and the illustrations are yummy. I have not delved into it deeply as I am unlikely to actually draft from it but it’s already giving me ideas. As a home sewer I tend to “franken pattern”.

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By: Kathleenhttp://www.fashion-incubator.com/archive/review-patternmaking-for-menswear/comment-page-1/#comment-183160 Mon, 10 Feb 2014 15:25:19 +0000 http://www.fashion-incubator.com/?p=13545#comment-183160 Hey Gareth, thanks for stopping by! I’m so pleased to hear from you.

Gail: I’d started to compose a response last week with the idea of creating a stand alone post but I delayed since I’m bound to create dissent.

This topic -the difference btwn patternmaking for men and women- is somewhat controversial. When I’ve tried to answer it -even within strictly defined parameters, I hear all about it. Perhaps it is fitting to open with the observance: The smaller the stakes, the more vicious the politics.

In my opinion, the basic concepts of drafting are the same for men, women and children. Saying so does not negate that each segment of the market has its variables with respect to fitting and proportion. The manner in which I would -for example- draft a hood for a man, a woman, or a child is exactly the same. The proportions and design of each will be different (children’s cannot have drawstrings) but the method by which I construct the draft is exactly the same.

That said, I completely understand why images of women in a drafting book, for one who strictly wants to draft men’s clothes, is not ideal.

It is also useful to remember who is using a given book. Mostly, it is not the most experienced practitioners, we rarely consult books. Books are used by those who are developing skills, so targeted and more specified drafting instruction will be helpful to them.

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By: Gareth Kershawhttp://www.fashion-incubator.com/archive/review-patternmaking-for-menswear/comment-page-1/#comment-183159 Mon, 10 Feb 2014 12:09:32 +0000 http://www.fashion-incubator.com/?p=13545#comment-183159 Thanks to all you enthusiastic pattern cutters who have left such great discussion about the merits of my book. Its good to see such topics debated and rightly so.
I hope you enjoy using it.
Big thanks to Kathleen Fasanella for your in depth review and constructive criticism. I am an avid follower of Fashion-Incubator, fantastic Blog!
Kind regards
Gareth Kershaw

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By: JustGailhttp://www.fashion-incubator.com/archive/review-patternmaking-for-menswear/comment-page-1/#comment-182878 Sat, 01 Feb 2014 15:45:48 +0000 http://www.fashion-incubator.com/?p=13545#comment-182878 question from a home sewer – what’s different in pattern making for men vs. women, besides the basic shapes of the resulting patterns? I know men’s patterns have broader shoulders, no bustline, waist-to-hip ratio is different, pants are cut differently, etc. Is there a difference in grading increments for different sizes? Different ease allowances?

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By: LinBhttp://www.fashion-incubator.com/archive/review-patternmaking-for-menswear/comment-page-1/#comment-182758 Thu, 30 Jan 2014 17:23:40 +0000 http://www.fashion-incubator.com/?p=13545#comment-182758 I agree that it makes one seem provincial (at best!) to complain about what system of measurement is used in a drafting book. Since I tend to measure empirically — first joint of my index finger is pretty close to 5/8″ so I use that to add seam allowance to pattern pieces, for example — I rarely worry about exact measurements anyway. But, then, I am sewing only for myself and/or family members, not on a production schedule or for retail work.

It makes about as much sense to complain about which “number language” an author uses as to complain about the “word language” an author uses. As long as there are decent illustrations, one need not be able to read the instructions. You don’t HAVE to purchase or use the book, unless it is required by a teacher for a class you must pass in order to achieve graduation, or certification, or licensure. In that case, suck it up and do your best to cope. Once you’re on your own, you can discover your own “best practices.”

Oh, dear, that sounded quite mean and preachy. Sigh.

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By: Kathleenhttp://www.fashion-incubator.com/archive/review-patternmaking-for-menswear/comment-page-1/#comment-182553 Tue, 28 Jan 2014 22:50:11 +0000 http://www.fashion-incubator.com/?p=13545#comment-182553 Jennifer: The thing I really love about CAD is being able to have the best of both worlds. I can change my settings to metric and input the measures provided by customers and then switch it to inches to do my part of it and then switch it back again before sending the CAD file. Or, I can start with inches and before adding seam allowances, switch to metric. Etc.

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By: Richard Chttp://www.fashion-incubator.com/archive/review-patternmaking-for-menswear/comment-page-1/#comment-182418 Mon, 27 Jan 2014 21:40:49 +0000 http://www.fashion-incubator.com/?p=13545#comment-182418 Intrigued and ordered. I’ll report on the message boards.

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