Comments on: Useful 3D printing -sewing machine jigs & fixtures http://www.fashion-incubator.com/archive/useful-3d-printing-sewing-machine-jigs-fixtures/ How to start a clothing line or run the one you have, better. Wed, 22 Oct 2014 01:48:18 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0 By: Frances MChttp://www.fashion-incubator.com/archive/useful-3d-printing-sewing-machine-jigs-fixtures/comment-page-1/#comment-163332 Sun, 18 Aug 2013 02:50:24 +0000 http://www.fashion-incubator.com/?p=12943#comment-163332 I have been trying to catch up on your posts so I’m late to this one. I want to point out that to make something with the 3-D printer, you will have to design your object then translate it into computer speak. So, unless you are capable of doing this yourself, you will have to hire some who is.

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By: Darahttp://www.fashion-incubator.com/archive/useful-3d-printing-sewing-machine-jigs-fixtures/comment-page-1/#comment-158465 Wed, 24 Jul 2013 17:17:44 +0000 http://www.fashion-incubator.com/?p=12943#comment-158465 Why wasn’t one of the 3D print houses on demand mentioned here? Or cheap places to buy a printer that works? 3D printers like Plastibots we love are only around $1,000 each which is pretty reasonable if you’re looking to do folders/jigs in house. Alternatively, Shapeways.com already does 3D Printing on demand including metals with a ship time of 1-2 weeks. Average price is $16-50 for a new jig we found in either plastic or metal. Given how much I’ve paid for some jigs this seems more than reasonable to dip your toe in the pool if you’re not ready to buy your own yet.

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By: Teresahttp://www.fashion-incubator.com/archive/useful-3d-printing-sewing-machine-jigs-fixtures/comment-page-1/#comment-158336 Sat, 13 Jul 2013 12:57:45 +0000 http://www.fashion-incubator.com/?p=12943#comment-158336 Someone at work has a vintage bound buttonhole device that you use to achieve identical results for each side and each buttonhole. Have you seen it? I think it was made by Dritz.

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By: Kathleen Lewishttp://www.fashion-incubator.com/archive/useful-3d-printing-sewing-machine-jigs-fixtures/comment-page-1/#comment-158224 Fri, 05 Jul 2013 01:22:26 +0000 http://www.fashion-incubator.com/?p=12943#comment-158224 We have also had different types of folders made for our machines for different jobs. My sewing machine mechanic is a wiz at making any type of jig, folder, binder, and adapting our machines to do the job as quickly as possible. Customers never asked for them and we have a box of past ones. I would just add into the price per piece and it never was an issue to the customer. They wouldn’t know what to do with them anyway. It was always designed to fit one of our machines.

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By: Kathleenhttp://www.fashion-incubator.com/archive/useful-3d-printing-sewing-machine-jigs-fixtures/comment-page-1/#comment-158214 Thu, 04 Jul 2013 00:11:14 +0000 http://www.fashion-incubator.com/?p=12943#comment-158214 Adrienne, what you’re describing sounds like what we call a guide or marking template. It’s in the book (pp 150-153). Imo (based on experience), a pattern isn’t complete if you haven’t provided the guides, it is part and parcel of the pattern. So yes you would charge the customer for them as part of the pattern process.

I get what you’re saying but I don’t think these are jigs because they’re used to mark placement before sewing. Jigs and such are used in the sewing process itself, holding or forming the workpiece as it goes under the needle.

If your customer needs the more expensive type then you would provide the pattern for it to be made and the customer would be responsible for paying whomever to make it for them.

If there is a tool or resource to improve flow… we’ve talked about that a lot. Even in this entry I mention that it is typical for a customer to own attachments (for which they don’t own the machines). Attachments=jigs. You can only do a cost benefit analysis. It costs X hourly to sew; it will take X hours more without the tool vs with it. Etc. They may decide they don’t want the attachment. It’s their choice.

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By: Stu Friedberghttp://www.fashion-incubator.com/archive/useful-3d-printing-sewing-machine-jigs-fixtures/comment-page-1/#comment-158213 Thu, 04 Jul 2013 00:00:48 +0000 http://www.fashion-incubator.com/?p=12943#comment-158213 In the contract machining world (which has many business similarities with sewn-products), there’s something called non-recurring engineering (NRE). This shows up on quotes, and covers tooling/jig/fixture development. So in that world, it generally gets charged to the client explicitly.

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By: Adrienne Gonzaleshttp://www.fashion-incubator.com/archive/useful-3d-printing-sewing-machine-jigs-fixtures/comment-page-1/#comment-158208 Wed, 03 Jul 2013 13:53:24 +0000 http://www.fashion-incubator.com/?p=12943#comment-158208 Most jigs I make are simple ones for consistency in placement. Sometimes they are marking jigs, you know, with slots for chalking. At the tactical company I used to work for we made marking jigs for almost every product. Jigs can help solve a lot of problems, in my opinion.

Since I can make those myself and they save me time I don’t usually even mention them to the client. In the event that a more expensive type of jig made by a third party needed to be made to add to a machine, that’s what I am talking about.

This is a larger concept in my brain, actually. If there is a tool or resource that would improve the work flow/quality etc of the finished product, do you sell that to the client or buy it yourself? Where is the balance?

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By: Bentehttp://www.fashion-incubator.com/archive/useful-3d-printing-sewing-machine-jigs-fixtures/comment-page-1/#comment-158204 Wed, 03 Jul 2013 04:39:01 +0000 http://www.fashion-incubator.com/?p=12943#comment-158204 Thanks for todays lesson. Now I know what a jig is. Sounds like this contractor has more flexibility due to this 3D printing option/making of jigs that could benefit a DE with ideas “outside the box”.
Interesting!

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By: Kathleenhttp://www.fashion-incubator.com/archive/useful-3d-printing-sewing-machine-jigs-fixtures/comment-page-1/#comment-158202 Wed, 03 Jul 2013 01:26:54 +0000 http://www.fashion-incubator.com/?p=12943#comment-158202 Very good point Adrienne but let us put this into context. What kind of jigs have you made and or what job did they perform that made your life easier?

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By: Adrienne Gonzaleshttp://www.fashion-incubator.com/archive/useful-3d-printing-sewing-machine-jigs-fixtures/comment-page-1/#comment-158197 Tue, 02 Jul 2013 21:27:29 +0000 http://www.fashion-incubator.com/?p=12943#comment-158197 OOH! I thought of a question! If a job requires a jig, other than simple paper ones, to be made, how do you recommend it to the client? Since it’s purchased by the client but used by the maker, do you just “sell” the client on why a jig will help their product? What’s an appropriate way to bring that up?

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