Vintage pattern design update

Posted by Kathleen Fasanella on Mar 30, 2005 at 10:36 pm / Contest and Projects, Lean Manufacturing, Newbies, Patterns, Quality / Trackback

This post refers to the previous vintage pattern design contest. All of this belongs under comments of that post but not everybody will know to look there for updates so I put it here. Also, some people are writing me directly or posting to another list instead of placing their comments here so I have to summarize and address those. Btw, I’m very pleased with the response. Invite some more friends.


People seem to be interested in the project but they either want to personalize it or they don’t have the specified fabric in the specified color (white rayon). This is not a problem, this was just supposed to be for fun, I didn’t think anybody would actually do it so let’s just play a little first until we get to know each other and can work together. Okay, I agree that not everybody may have access to rayon for the project. I understand that but I had to specify something. I picked rayon because it has some drape to it and it’s not anything close to silk in price. I think a poly georgette would work if somebody had some of that. As it was, even I couldn’t come up with some white rayon so I got a length of coral micro-fiber something. What happened to rayon? There wasn’t any in the store. weird.

Also, this exercise is from an industrial perspective because it’s useful to learn a different mind-set. Keep what’s useful and leave the rest. As an industrial exercise -to have a pattern made- you have to specify the fabric type so you can draft for it. There was also a little trick in my contest. Rayon shrinks. I was hoping people would catch on and either pre-wash their fabrics or cut to compensate. Now, if you don’t have any rayon, do what you can. Use the lightest colored fabric you have. The fabric restriction -a light colored solid, no prints- is important because it’s very difficult to see problems if your eye is chasing detail all over the piece or it’s too dark to see ugly lines. So cut it out of the lightest color possible This is just for the try-outs. If you like the way it comes out, maybe you can cut it out of something else. Please do not assume your project will be final-form on your first try. If it is, you’re a better pattern maker than I am and I’d like to meet you, so please call me.

Styling. Again, this is just for fun, so have fun. Let’s call the style depicted as the source of your own vision of what you’d like it to look like. As it is, I was going to cheat myself (don’t think that I didn’t know that a lot of you were going to cheat either because I did). The block I’m using is a V-neck bias cut dress that I knocked out of the book _Madeleine Vionnet_ by Betty Kirke. I was going to adjust the neckline before I slash and spread to shape it to match the basic neckline but now I’m not. Just do something that folks could readily identify as relating to the design. As it is, I’ve decided to make mine a dress so I’ll be attaching a skirt. I don’t know about sleeves tho. I’m looking for an excuse to use my Klein Bottle sleeves but I don’t think it’d work on this. Btw, have I mentioned I’ve done a lot of experimental type pattern drafting? It’s all math, I wish I knew more about it. I’m horribly obsessed with topography, origami math, Escher and Erte. I wish I knew more math.

Cheating…welcome to my industrial mind-set again. C’mon chicas, what’s the goal here? The goal is to have the best looking prototype based on this design. That’s it. Not only is draping not cheating, who said you even had to make the thing yourself? Someone was concerned whether draping was cheating which brought up my whole belief system of just what is cheating. First off, who said you couldn’t enter the contest by hiring someone to draft and sew your design for you? Nobody. I surely didn’t. In my opinion, the person who did that should be the winner! That’s the point of manufacturing. You can’t do everything yourself and once you figure that out is when you start to make broad strides. Hire out to others what they do best and nurture a talent.

I don’t see cheating the same way you do. For example, I once gave a class in Manufacturing 101 here in El Paso and about 20 people showed up. Three of the attendees came together, three sisters who already operate a going concern, a laundry facility that processes denim for local manufacturers. Anyway, I always give an opening quiz designed mostly to open people’s eyes to the myths of the industry but it also included some practical questions, and I look over and these three chicks are working together on the test, sharing answers, passing their sheets back and forth amongst each other. I’ll bet you’d consider that cheating just as some of the others in the room did but I didn’t, they were smart. The test wasn’t really about what any single person knew about the business, it was knowing how to know, it was knowing where to go to get the information you needed. These ladies just shared information, there was no contest amongst them to see who was the “smartest”; they just wanted a positive result (they got the best scores too). There’s a lesson there for all of you. To me, cheating means taking something that’s not yours and saying it is and that’s in word, thought or deed.

Conclusion? Take smart short-cuts. The goal is not to be the smartest person in the room; it’s to be the most successful. Being successful doesn’t mean stomping on other people but nobody’s getting hurt if you’re paying for the work.

Related entries:
Vintage pattern design contest
Vintage pattern design update
Re-inventing Vionnet & 24001 draft
Vintage pattern post #4
Vintage pattern post #5

4 Responses to “Vintage pattern design update”

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kathleen
May 6th, 2005
5:36 PM

This is a compilation and crude importation of all the comments posted at the original site for this document. Feel free to add your comments.
———————–
3/30/2005 10:19:35 PM Autism Diva said:
This is way cool.

Can’t tell you what the fish hook things are on the pantograph, but the pantograph is a thing that allows you to trace over small pants and make them into big pants…I’m pretty sure.

Why do you only have book on your Amazon.com wish list. I have gold jewelry on mine…or I have had. No one every looks at my wish list, so I can put anything on there. Do not ask me what ID my wish list is listed under. I prefer to keep my desire for sapphire earrings private.

My most recent Amazon.com purchases, a silicone rubber “Orka” hot pot mitt, in Red. A silicone hot pot holder (small square thing) in “jade”. These are for my disabled adult kid who cooks for xyrself with the stove and toaster oven from xyr wheelchair. I have had a hard time finding an appropriate oven mitt….Kathleen dear. How about an oven mitt designing contest, one that produces a comfortable, cotton or wool, quilted oven glove thing.
I also ordered the APA publication manual, neccessary (I always spell that word wrong) for a class I will start next week. APA is the American Psychological Association. They are picky about how you cite your sources, etc.

I ordered a goody through ebay from Sharper Image, it’s a little timer doodad, I suppose you read what I wrote about it on aut advo. It’s supposed to be my new external memory.

Nice blog, very nice blog you have hear, my dear. Notice that I have made myself at home. I won’t be doing your dishes, though.

3/30/2005 10:20:42 PM Autism Diva said:
BOOKS on your Amazon.com wish list
not
“book”

3/30/2005 10:35:25 PM Kathleen said:
camille, about that apa publication manual, did you know you can get a citation software program? It also organizes all of your research. I test drove a program called Citation 8 for awhile -and it was good- but it still didn’t do everything I needed (like saving entire web page files etc) so I got a program called AskSam. Check it out at http://www.asksam.com/products.asp . The citation portion of that program will track and automatically format your entries.

About wish lists. It doesn’t matter anyway. Nobody buys me anything.

The oven mitts is an interesting idea tho. I wonder if someone will pick up on that and ask you for more specifics. I have a vintage pattern of oven mitts from the 50’s. I also have tons of vintage apron patterns; those are really cute.

The boy gets $10 a week, ostensibly to do the dishes, lol.

3/31/2005 04:31:39 PM Jess said:
I was wondering about the Rayon too, it is hard to find. I have some pale blue soft flowy fabric that I was thinking of using. You should visit my new livejournal that I opened today for men’s fashion design. I’d love to hear your comments. http://www.livejournal.com/community/clothes_for_men/ if that links doesn’t work you can just go to livejournal.com and search for user clothes_for_men

deborah
April 6th, 2008
5:24 PM

You can purchase rayon from Dharma Trading Company, http://www.dharmatrading.com. White rayon challis is $5.97 a yard.

Debbie
March 15th, 2009
8:28 AM

I really like this website. I am the single mother of two. My eldest son is autistic. I began my own fashion line after becoming suddenly unemployed. (I am trying to build something for my boys.) I am currently studying Fashion Design at the Art Institute of Philadelphia. I love it! I have modeled for years, but had no idea that the clothing I dreamed about would one day manifest itself as a fashion line. Kathleen, I think this is great. I presently see my clothing in my sleep, and make them when I wake up. I don’t make patterns yet. I just throw the material down on the floor, cut it, and sew. I just began this venture last July. I have clothes racks filled with clothing. (As a matter of fact, I am wearing one of my dresses as we speak.) I am happy to say, my clothes have been used in fashion shows already! Kathleen, I am happy you have this resource. I have an upcoming class in Manufacturing, and wanted to get a jump on things. This is just what I needed.

[...] entries: Vintage pattern design contest Vintage pattern design update Re-inventing Vionnet & 24001 draft Vintage pattern post #4 Vintage pattern post #5 addthis_pub [...]

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