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Fabric mills, distributors, and stores

 
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Eric H
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 25, 2008 1:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Incidentally, if a mill sells spongebob print or even teddy bear print fabric in a baby wale fabric through JoAnn's or Walmart, then they are the manufacturer. I wonder if they have figured this out.
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Esther
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 26, 2008 9:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't know about that. Certain print fabric suppliers have already licensed those characters and the fabric chains just get permission to sell them. Marcus Brothers does a lot of licensed fabric. It's obvious when it is a cartoon character but a problem when it is a benign floral print (redone from a vintage, public domain print). I don't know that fabric chains "private label" fabric because they do special buying sessions with major suppliers where they negotiate volume discounts.

In any event, they now have to have GCC's on file regardless.
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Eric H
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 26, 2008 6:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
In any event, they now have to have GCC's on file regardless.


Only for products marketed to/for children, right?
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Esther
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 26, 2008 10:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

GCC's are supposed to be issued on all regulated products, AFAIK because of section 102. Fabric is regulated for flammability. I would assume additional testing for fabric with licensed characters or prints that are clearly intended for children. The question is who does this additional testing? The mill, fabric distributor/jobber, or the manufacturer of the end product. Right now I am assuming it will have to be the manufacturer because the fabric mills do not guarantee suitability for any intended end purpose. I don't know how much pressure DE's can apply to the mills to split the costs or do the testing.
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Wacky Hermit
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 27, 2008 8:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would imagine children's print fabric is marketed to adults. Children don't generally have the wherewithal to sew fabric (although my 8 year old knows how to use the sewing machine already).
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Eric H
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 27, 2008 10:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wacky Hermit wrote:
I would imagine children's print fabric is marketed to adults. Children don't generally have the wherewithal to sew fabric (although my 8 year old knows how to use the sewing machine already).


By that interpretation, children's toys are marketed to adults because children don't have the wherwithal to get a job and earn money. Lazy curtain-crawlers!

Esther wrote:
GCC's are supposed to be issued on all regulated products, AFAIK because of section 102. Fabric is regulated for flammability.


Flammability is only for pajamas. One of the CPSC FAQs points out that curtains, for example, are exempt as a household item.

Esther wrote:
The question is who does this additional testing?


I was making a point about selling fabric to parents at consumer fabric stores for use by children in a children's product. The manufacturer in that narrow, limited case would be either the mill, if they sell it under their label, or a distributor or the fabric store, if sold under their label. Whoever causes it to be made for the purpose of selling it for use as a children's good. I'm just wondering if the mills are aware of this. They already do lots of in-house testing, but that doesn't help them with the requirement for 3rd party testing.

On the other hand, if someone buys from the fabric store and makes stuff to sell to children, then they are the manufacturer. Allowing component testing would be very useful to them.


Last edited by Eric H on Sat Dec 27, 2008 10:18 am; edited 2 times in total
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Esther
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 28, 2008 6:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I see fabric stores doing the same as the mills - they can't guarantee their fabric as suitable for any intended end use. That would include children's products. While I can see some fabric mills assuming the cost of testing, where does that put jobbers and distributors?
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